If you’re going to build an email list, then you’re also going to have to create a free giveaway that is worth having. It has to be something that people want so badly that they won’t hesitate for even a moment to give you their email address. And if you use a double opt-in, and most people do, then you want your prospects to be glued to their inboxes, eagerly waiting for the confirmation email to arrive so that they can get it.

How many free giveaways have stirred like that?

If you make that your goal, then you’ll have a much better chance at producing something that will get the attention of your prospects. And anything less than that will simply be ignored. You may get a lot of visitors, but that’s all.

It will be like all those stores that you visit in the mall. Even before the greeter has a chance to say “Good morning. Welcome to . . .” you have said, “I’m just looking.”

The essence of the free giveaway is in the giveaway funnel. As you know, your giveaway funnel consists of giveaways that collectively solve a big problem and whose parts solve smaller one. You may have dozens of giveaways in your funnel or only a few. It doesn’t matter.

What does matter is consistency. There has to be a central theme, a definitive problem that troubles your prospects and which your giveaways uniquely solve. That’s not to say that you’re the only one whose giveaways solve the problem. What it means is that you solve them in a way that is unique to you. It’s your personality, your presentation, and your teaching. You haven’t simply copied it from Guru 1, 2, or 3.

One of the problems that Internet marketers face is creating a free giveaway that is inconsistent with their giveaway funnels. The giveaways in the funnel itself all “hang together”, but the free giveaway is a sort of orphan. It may be valuable in and of itself, but it has little to do with the central theme of the giveaway funnel itself.

And the problem with that is that prospects who visit your site do so with the understanding that your free giveaway will lead them naturally from the content that they saw elsewhere online to that giveaway and onto your list where they can get access to other similar giveaways; ones that solve the problem that you originally addressed.

But what happens is that the free giveaway is unrelated to the core of the giveaway funnel. That confuses visitors, and they don’t sign up because they don’t see the connection.

You must make the connection for your prospects, and you can do that by making sure that it is consistent with your funnel.

It’s essential that you have a free giveaway to give away to subscribers. It’s important because it gives them an opportunity to see if the value that you’ve put into it is sufficient to make them want any more from you.

But creating a valuable giveaway seems to be a lot easier than naming it.

The tendency seems to be to identify it according to the solution, rather than the problem it solves. For example, Semantic Revolution Course. Does this tell you what the problem is?

Or Free eBook (I kid you not!).

Or, The XYZ WonderWheel. Makes wonder what it’s about. The question is, are you curious enough to find out? Does it feel like something that you’d want to spend time to discover?

Although each of these giveaways may be the best things since sliced bread, it’s impossible to discover whether they solve your problem without going to the landing page to learn more.

You’re probably thinking that the context in which the link was found would make that obvious.

Not necessarily. For one thing there’s usually a limit to the number of words that can be used, and for another you don’t want your prospects to have to think about whether or not the giveaway is for them.

You want them to know it.

You also need to make sure that you identify the right problem.

Let’s say that your prospects want to learn how to get subscribers by using Twitter. If you name your giveaway, “How to Get Subscribers with Social Media”, then almost no one in your target market is likely to want it because they won’t know if it’s for Twitter, Facebook, or all a bunch of other platforms.

If you name it, “How to Get Subscribers with Twitter”, then those who want to use that platform will be attracted to your giveaway because it addresses the problem that they want to solve.

You have to specify the problem. In this case, it’s how to use Twitter to do something. So the giveaway name has to focus on it.

Anytime you create a free giveaway, you must focus on the problem that you want to solve, and then name it accordingly. That’s because you want your prospects to be sure that it is for them.